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IAQ Sub-standard in Three Quarters of UK Classrooms

According to a new survey of 133 schools across the United Kingdom, three-in-five teachers believe there is a link between indoor air quality and student health, with as many believing poor air quality is aggravating asthma and other lung conditions.

The Air Quality in UK Classrooms Report survey commissioned by ventilation solutions provider Airflow Developments also finds that ill-effects on health are 55 per cent more likely in cities, where both industrial and road pollution are more prevalent.

This comes in a summer where the UK experienced record high temperatures, exacerbating pollution and its effects. Reports from scientists at the EU Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service have warned of spikes in unhealthy levels of pollution around Europe*, which are likely to become more common each year. Increased pollution can irritate and inflame the lungs.

How are teachers being affected?

Almost two-thirds (63 per cent) of all teachers surveyed said poor air quality is affecting teachers’ physical and mental health. While 31 per cent of those at schools with ‘below standard’ air quality reported that despite requesting improvements, no action has been taken.

However, more than a quarter (27 per cent) said their school is trying to improve air quality, but cannot due to a lack of funding or government support.

What improvements do teachers want to see?

Faced with sub-standard air quality, teachers identified the changes they want schools to make:

  • Replace old heating appliances (which can contribute to indoor air pollution) – 72%

  • Install air filtration or purification systems – 71%

  • Ban cars on streets with schools during school run times – 38%

  • Relocate playgrounds and classroom windows away from roads – 32%

With pupils currently on their summer holidays, now is the time for schools to make changes such as these.

Alan Siggs, Airflow Developments managing director, comments: “We commissioned this survey to raise awareness of the problems poor air quality creates and how it impacts the classroom.  Improving air quality is our area of expertise and we know the solutions available to overcome these problems.

“However, what we didn’t know and what this survey has highlighted is how bad the situation is and how it affects teachers and students. It’s clear that funding solutions need to be found quickly and there must be support from the upper reaches of government for that to happen. Investment in modern ventilation systems is a must for the health of the future generation: we’ve seen first-hand the stark difference good air quality can have.

“To gain this investment, grassroots pressure is required to focus the government and local councils on the issue. Schools, teachers and even parents can raise the issue at PTA meetings or with local councillors to start turning the screw.

“The recent resurgence in Covid cases makes action on air quality even more pressing. Nobody wants a situation where children and teachers are returning to classrooms that facilitates the transmission of the virus.  If measures are put into place, the health of both students and teachers can only benefit.”

Nicola D’Urso, a school speech and language therapist, says: “Some schools I work in have indoor areas which are poorly ventilated without any windows. I’ve seen examples of children fainting and disengaging due to dehydration in excessively hot and stuffy classrooms. It’s not uncommon for children to become drowsy and even the brightest students can stop interacting in lessons. I notice caring and responsible teachers often having to prioritise children’s health and wellbeing during lessons instead of teaching them the educational content.

“The main obstacle is that senior leadership teams in schools are at the mercy of their local council’s policy on clean air and limiting air pollution. The roadblock for schools is that it’s a bit out of their hands given that it’s up to the council and the government to get a grasp of air pollution and put adequate policies in place.”

Airflow Developments also argues local councils can do their bit by introducing school street systems which ban cars on streets with schools during school run times and reduce pollution at the school gates, and urges schools to campaign for the introduction of school streets.

Author

  • Staff Reporter

    FMIndustry.com covers the latest news, trends and opinion from the facilities management (FM) and corporate real estate (CRE) sectors. The FM market is currently estimated to be worth USD 1 trillion annually and is projected to grow at a compounded annualised rate of approximately 5% between now and 2026.

CAMFIL HVAC Filtration Solutions

Staff Reporter

FMIndustry.com covers the latest news, trends and opinion from the facilities management (FM) and corporate real estate (CRE) sectors. The FM market is currently estimated to be worth USD 1 trillion annually and is projected to grow at a compounded annualised rate of approximately 5% between now and 2026.
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