Register
 (photo: Rafael De Lancer)
09.05.2019, 09:50

Approaching Commercial Refurbishments

Furnishing & Decor, White Papers & Briefings, EMEA

Renovation planning can avoid many of the pitfalls associated with refurbishing business premises.

 

Your company may have moved into an old building or require a revamp of existing premises. However, regardless of the reason, success in renovation can be achieved by following a few key steps.


Ensuring you have permission

There are a number of reasons why you might need permission to use the building you’re moving into or renovating. The most important is ‘use classes’ – particularly if you’re planning on changing the building you’re moving into from a residential to a commercial property. The type of changes you’re making to make to the building might also need planning permission – if you’re making an extension, for example. Before you start hiring builders and using a digger hire service, be sure to get all of the fundamentals out of the way first.


Being mindful of workers and other companies in shared premises

Productivity is often a casualty of refurbishment, and how your employees will continue to work throughout the refurbishment should be a concern to keep mind of. While it’s advised that you keep an eye on productivity while refurbishment is taking place, it might be that your employees have to move out temporarily. As part of your refurbishment plan, you should be considering how your workers will continue to carry out their day-to-day jobs. 


Considering practical limitations

Taking down walls and other changes to a building's fabric often require associated changes to utilities infrastructure, and require a practical and level-headed assessment of any design limitations.


An opportunity to replace

Refurbishment projects are often the perfect time for a company to reassess its technology needs, as they are usually accompanied by downtime which presents an opportunity to replace old with new technology. You may find your old systems may have been wasting energy and money. Chatting with your contractor about what could be replaced and how much it will cost upfront, and how much you will save in the long-run could be a savvy move for your business.

 

Overhauling your business property can be a costly venture, however, you may end up making some of it back. On top of the benefits of buying more efficient furniture and technology, there’s also the benefit of creating a much more pleasant space to be in.

 

 

Article rating:

vote data

Leave a reply

Pictured: Compass Group PLC CEO, Dominic Blakemore. (photo: Compass Group UK & Ireland)
News Editor  - 11.01.2021

Putting the Planet First

Compass Group is among 25 companies to have confirmed support for the Terra Carta pledge launched by HRH The Prince of Wales’ Sustainable Markets Initiative.

 (photo: Compass Group UK & Ireland)
News Editor  - 18.12.2020

Providing 20,000 Meals to Those in Need

The Wimbledon Foundation has extended its support for organisations addressing food poverty at Christmas and beyond as part of its response to COVID-19.

 (photo: Meritt Thomas)
Simon Green  - 06.01.2021

Smoke Bombing or Air Sanitisation Units?

Simon Green, Head of Value Engineering, Sourcing & Quality for the Airdri Group, explains why air sanitisation units are preferable to the practice of smoke bombing in workplaces post-Covid-19.

 (photo: Brigton Hollingdean MRF/Veolia Environnemental Sevices)
Staff Reporter  - 17.08.2020

Backing the UK's Green Economic Recovery

Veolia’s latest Sustainability strategy, Impact 2023, aims to support innovation and new infrastructure by adding to over £2 billion the company has already invested in the UK's circular economy.

 (photo: )
FM Editor  - 18.12.2019

The Drains of Christmas Future

UK wastewater and drainage solutions provider Lanes Group has reimagined "A Christmas Carol" into a story about the importance of clean drains.

 (photo: )
FM Editor  - 18.12.2019

University of Manchester Clean Room Contract

SPIE UK has won an 18-month design, supply, install and commission contract for a clean room at The University of Manchester, as part of a new build being constructed by Balfour Beatty.