Register
 (photo: ILKER CELIK)
11.02.2020, 11:46

Inspiring Female Talent in FM

Facilities Management, Training & Education, Maintenance Engineering, Talent, United Kingdom
Justine Salmon, divisional director with ABM UK, advises on how best to inspire the new generation of female talent to follow careers in facilities management and the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

 

The facilities management (FM) and engineering industry has an image problem that needs to change. People don’t know about the opportunities it offers, and can often think it’s all about men and oily rags. This couldn’t be further from the truth. 

 

As an industry, we’re seeing the impact of these negative perceptions. There’s an acute lack of emerging female talent and a growing skills gap across the board. 

 

Looking into the roots of this problem, ABM UK commissioned research amongst 2,000 students1 to find out what they knew about the industry and its career prospects. Worryingly, the research found that a fifth (21 per cent) of girls associated ‘engineering’ with ‘a boy’s job’. Going further, over a third (39 per cent) of students said they wouldn’t consider working in engineering and FM because they didn’t know anything about it.    

 

To address this, ABM UK set up the Junior Engineering Engagement Programme (J.E.E.P.) in 2017, engaging year seven students with the principles of facilities management and engineering in a five-part course.  

 

In just three years, the programme has grown from 36 London students enrolled in the pilot year, to now having been taught to over 450 students across the UK. We’re seeing first-hand how initiatives like J.E.E.P. can get students, particularly girls, interested in STEM subjects and inspire the next generation of technical talent.  

 

If you’re looking to engage girls with STEM subjects, consider the following three steps.  


Make STEM applicable to everyday life 

One of the most effective ways to get young girls interested in FM-related activities is to apply lessons to real-life scenarios. Think about simple ways to make theory more engaging and use relatable scenarios to build upon their initial interest.  

 

Our curriculum tasks the students with responding to FM problems that teams need to anticipate or respond to in real life, such as a black out in a shopping centre during peak hours. The students are challenged to identify the cause of the issue, create an immediate solution and look at a possible long-term fix. By encouraging problem-solving in a familiar environment, the association of FM with a specific gender is deconstructed.  


Present relevant role models

One of the most rewarding aspects of J.E.E.P. is session three, where team members from across ABM UK visit schools for a Q&A about the industry. 

 

It’s so important to have female representation in the class to demonstrate that careers in FM and engineering aren’t solely for men. We celebrate our accomplishments, career paths and projects that we’re working on, and encourage them to think about other women in the industry who have made significant changes to society.  


Put emphasis on the process, not on grades

At the end of the course, our J.E.E.P. students aren’t given a final grade. We want to be encouraging students to broaden their perspectives and try something new, rather than focus on their scores.  

 

When introducing students into new fields of learning, encouragement is key. Turn their focus to the experiment they’re working on and reassure them that mistakes are unavoidable and will only help guide them to a solution. Without fear that making mistakes will impact their scores, we find that students become confident working through trial and error.  

 

We are determined to change the face of FM and engineering in the UK; to inspire and establish a new and enthusiastic generation of young talent that is gender even. New government data2 shows that in 2019, the number of women working in STEM- related occupations in the UK reached one million for the first time. If this trend continues, we should see 30 percent of STEM roles filled by women by 2030.  

 

While this is great progress, we see this as an opportunity to do more. What better way to engage female talent, than to focus our attention on the next generation. 

 

 

 

 

 

Article rating:

vote data

Leave a reply

Jacob Aarup-Andersen. (photo: )
News Editor  - 19.05.2020, 17:02

ISS Names New CEO

ISS has appointed banker, Jacob Aarup-Andersen, to succeed Jeff Gravenhorst on his retirement on 1 September 2020.

 (photo: gdtography)
Mark Gifford  - 04.05.2020, 20:53

Building Measurement and Verification in Lockdown

Mark Gifford, Technical Services Manager with global building performance specialist IES, considers the implications of Zero Running Buildings for Energy Services and FM teams during COVID-19.

Edge Hill University Campus. (photo: Edge Hill University)
News Editor  - 13.05.2020, 15:04

Celebrating Key Workers on World FM Day

Edge Hill University in Lancashire, North West England, is celebrating World FM Day today by thanking staff for their hard work during the year.

 (photo: )
News Editor  - 28.05.2020, 09:43

90-Day Remote Boiler Monitoring Trial

Vericon Systems is offering a free trial of its BCM:Connect remote boiler monitoring solution for Housing Associations and Social Housing providers.

 (photo: Daria Shevtsova)
News Editor  - 28.05.2020, 09:00

Harnessing AI to Reopen Properties in the "New Normal"

AI property management platform Facilio has launched REbuild, a ready-to-deploy operations toolkit which helps real estate owners respond to operational challenges during the recovery from Covid-19.

 (photo: )
News Editor  - 27.05.2020, 13:39

Medical Advisory Council to Guide Sodexo

Sodexo has established a Medical Advisory Council to support the development of new health and safety protocols across its global organisation.

 (photo: )
Staff Reporter  - 26.05.2020, 18:12

Flexible Supply Chains for the New Reality

Findings from a white paper from Bis Henderson Space suggest logistics professionals will develop more flexible and resilient supply chains in response to the 'new reality' emerging out of the...